Thursday, February 23, 2017

GlobalMedia: Mr. Nice Guy: An Intercultural Communication Test [VID] (W7-P5) Sp17


Now that we've covered some of the barriers (bricks) to effective intercultural communication, let's test you by looking at a "reel" life example of intercultural communication and see what you spot.



This is a clip that I edited and posted on YouTube. I use this clip in my Intercultural Communication course to introduce students to the difficulties of intercultural communication.

In the clip Jackie's fiancée has just arrived in the U.S.

Is there intercultural miscommunication? What is the problem exactly? Whose fault is it? Is it right to blame somebody?



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GlobalMedia: Intercultural Com: Effective Intercultural Com: Stereotypes & Ethnocentricism (W7-P4) Sp17


And now, for the last two bricks in the wall.  By the way, have you been thinking about how these bricks play a role in global communication?



A stereotype generally has the following pattern:
All people in a certain group have a certain characteristic or set of characteristics.

If you were looking for clip art for "Native Americans" and all that you found were images like the top two images above, would this be an example of stereotyping?  How?  Use the definition.   How does the bottom image break the stereotype?  What exactly is the stereotype?

How do you tear down this brick?

[Errata: "a general, fixed impression of a person based on group membership."]


























Generally speaking, a person who is ethnocentric thinks the ways of his or her people are the best and the ways of other groups are negative, backwards or inferior.  "Eating with chopsticks is stupid," they might say.

Ask me about "Zhong Guo."

Watch the following images.




What was your reaction to the images?  What does your reaction have to do with ethnocentrism?  Anything?

How do you "tear down" this brick?


How do all these bricks play a role in global communication?  How do they fit into our discussion of global communication?



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GlobalMedia: Intercultural Com: Effective Intercultural Com: Discrimination, Prejudice and Racism (W7-P3) Sp17


And now, some more important bricks in the wall, things that stop us from getting to effective intercultural communication.



How do you tear down this brick?
What is the difference between discrimination, prejudice, racism?  See the next few bricks.








Prejudice or some other problem/brick?


You probably think of some TV characters who are prejudiced.  Hank Hill, Archie Bunker, etc.  What examples can you think of?
How do you tear down this brick?

























Note that there are two definitions of racism given here.

Notice any connection between racism and prejudice as previously defined?

Also, what are the differences among racism, prejudice and discrimination?  They are related terms, but they are not the same thing.

How do you tear down this brick?




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